About Marina McCoy
Marina McCoy is an associate professor of philosophy at Boston College, where she teaches philosophy and in the BC PULSE service learning program. She is the author of Wounded Heroes: Vulnerability as a Virtue in Ancient Greek Philosophy (Oxford University Press, 2013). She and her husband are the parents to a young adult and a teenager and live in the Boston area.

Touch Heals and Restores

While all of our senses help us to learn and to know about the world, the sense of touch is perhaps the most intimate. Our skin defines our very boundaries as physical persons and is a point of connection to other people, nature, and objects in our world. All of us had fundamental experiences of touch in our receiving nurture as babies: we were held when we were fed, rocked and soothed when upset, and […]

Disney’s Lesson for Finding the Hidden Christ

Among my family’s summer vacation plans is a trip to Disney World to celebrate our new college graduate. While it has been more than a decade since our last visit, I remember a certain amount of wearily standing in line for rides and food. Luckily, Disney makes waiting in line a bit more enjoyable by providing themed decor in their waiting areas. Visitors can also hunt for “hidden Mickeys,” places where the shape of Mickey […]

Resting in the Lord’s Gaze

“How do you, Lord, look at me? What do you feel in your heart for me?” —John Eagan, SJ (from Hearts on Fire: Praying with Jesuits) As Christians, most of us desire to cultivate the capacity to love others well. We also have a deep desire to be loved, known, and seen as we really are. A simple practice that St. Ignatius Loyola encourages before prayer in the Spiritual Exercises is to begin by placing […]

Four Ways to Receive Joy

Easter is a 50-day-long season of celebration. As Christians, we often undertake Lenten practices but often do not undertake Easter practices past the first day of Easter. One reason may be that joy, peace, and other consolations are gifts from God. They mostly do not depend on an act of our own will. I often think of joy as the flower that blossoms when the plant of love has been well-tended. How, then, can we […]

Stay in Love

“Fall in love, stay in love, and it will decide everything.” —Pedro Arrupe, SJ Arrupe’s words about falling in love as a metaphor for vocation are well-known. (If you don’t know the full text of the work, you can find it here.) At Jesuit colleges like my own, we spend a lot of time on the part about falling in love: find work about which you can be passionate. Choose a major that draws you, […]

The Anima Christi During Holy Week

Among my favorite prayers to pray during Holy Week is the Anima Christi or “Soul of Christ.” Many of the lines are resonant with Passion Week, as the poem reflects on Christ’s body and spirit. Among my favorite lines are those at the center: “Within your wounds hide me. / Permit me not to be separated from you.” In the Passion, God unites himself to us so that we are never alone in our own […]

Five Ideas for Responding to a Refusal to Reconcile

Pope Francis declared this year to be a Jubilee Year of Mercy, a time to extend mercy to others through both acts of forgiveness and care for those who are poor or most in need. We also know ourselves to be in need of mercy as sinners. My favorite definition of mercy is that of my colleague Jim Keenan, SJ, who says that mercy is the willingness to enter into the chaos of another. In […]

A Gratitude Resolution

When I was a girl, I was a Girl Scout. Thankfully, we had an active troop leader who took us on all kinds of outdoor excursions, from camping and hiking to ice tobogganing, in all kinds of weather. Recently I thought of a song that we sometimes sang as Scouts, the “Johnny Appleseed Song.” It went: “The Lord is good to me, and so I thank the Lord, for giving me the things I need, the […]

Going Off Road in Advent

As we experience this season of Advent, the metaphor of a journey stands out to me. I think about the different journeys, both geographical and interior, that the Gospels describe even before Jesus arrives. Zechariah journeys from distrust and silence into belief and joyful proclamation. Mary travels to visit Elizabeth, who, like Mary, undergoes the deep internal changes of pregnancy and the slow transition into motherhood. Joseph dreams. Mary ponders. Eventually, they both travel to […]

Walking the Labyrinth

Recently, I walked a labyrinth. There are many ways to walk a labyrinth. One can walk it in silent meditation, attentive to each step and breath. One can walk a labyrinth while praying a specific prayer or recalling one’s life journey. This time, as I entered the path, I felt called to pray God’s names on the way into the center, one name for each step. There are many Biblical names for God. For example, […]

1 2 3 4 5