Sincere Gratitude

birthday cake

We recently celebrated my husband Rudy’s birthday. It was a simple and completely unassuming celebration. It was not at all what I had envisioned for him (I have a tendency to want more fanfare.), but it was perfect for Rudy. As I watched him laugh and smile and comment on each card he opened, as I witnessed his unabashed delight in opening his gift, as I observed the way his eyes absolutely twinkled in the sunlight streaming through the window as we sang him the blessing song, I was reminded of what gratitude really looks like. For Rudy, it wasn’t about an elaborate party or a pile of presents, it was about being loved by his family and being truly happy, thankful for the many simple blessings in his life. I was so struck by his expression as we sang to him; that beautiful, goofy expression of joy and gratitude stays rooted in my memory.

That night as I prayed the Examen, I spent some time considering gratitude. Gratitude is a big part of the Examen, and it is a part I faithfully list off each day. But therein lies the problem—I spout off a list. Yes, the list is different each day, and I do put thought into it, but it’s still just a list lacking any emotional investment. It’s a far cry from the sincere gratitude I witnessed in Rudy. I know how offended I get when someone thanks me in a haphazard way that essentially tells me, “Etiquette rules require that I say thank you,” but that is exactly what I am doing to God in my Examen each day. That moment watching Rudy made me realize that I am missing the point of gratitude in prayer. I am not giving God the satisfaction of seeing my goofy expression of awe and excitement at having received all that I have from Him. I am not offering God that real gratitude that stems from the heart. From that birthday experience, I am learning that it’s not just about taking the time to thank God; it’s about really allowing myself to feel that gratitude with Jesus right there with me to share in it.

Subscribe to dotMagis, the blog of Ignatian SpiritualityWhen we allow ourselves to feel truly grateful, it blooms in our whole being. That’s what I witnessed in my husband’s face in that moment. And I know now that it is what I want to offer God each day.

About Cara Callbeck 48 Articles
Cara Callbeck holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree and works in the public sector as a human resources professional. Cara recently completed the Spiritual Exercises and has since felt quite drawn to Ignatian spirituality. She is now on a quest to learn more and grow and to incorporate Ignatian spirituality in her life as a professional, mother, and “woman for others.” Cara lives in the Canadian Prairies with the two greatest blessings in her life—her husband and daughter.

6 Comments on Sincere Gratitude

  1. Thank you so much for this post. I needed to be reminded of the true meaning of both prayer and gratitude. Oh, and as a non-English-native-speaker ‘goofy’ always puts a smile on my face. Love that word :-)

  2. That is what it is all about. Gratitude. Shedding ourselves and putting on Christ for others. So that His light might shine on them and their lives. To thank God with all you are for all He gives us each moment of each day, is a awesome feeling . Try it you will like it. God Bless

    Lovingly yours
    Vivian

  3. The grace of awareness has enabled me to truly appreciate the subtle things that previously I took for granted. To be able to sit back at any time and literally take it all in is pretty awesome. Great reflection, many thanks…

  4. Cara, this is a beautiful reflection on one of the most important aspects of being in relationship with God. Gratitude is central to our faith and so often people are too busy to take a moment to thank others and to thank God. Gratitude requires us to focus on the Other and other people and that is transformational. Blessings to you and your family.

    • Thank you for this lovely reflection on what gratitude really looks like/feels like. Your examples called to mind a word my Irish (from Ireland) cousins use: homely. Of course their use of the word startled me at first because I’ve always heard it used here in a very pejorative way, so they had to quickly explain that for them it means home-like, with the connotation being “making you feel at home.” I think experiencing gratitude is like coming home to our true and intended place in the world, to our true selves in relation to the Creator. And I got all that from Rudy’s easy-going smile. Thank you.

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