The Wisdom App

Have you heard about the app that turns you into a happier, more grateful person, that makes you feel more balanced and peaceful, and that keeps you focused and on track every day? I sometimes call it “The Wisdom App,” even though the app’s developer originally used a different name (more on that later). The app is free, and you don’t even need a smartphone to use it. Here’s how it works: you commit to […]

The Cheer-Ups File

This is the last stop for the Make Today Matter blog hop, in which bloggers have been reflecting on the habits in Chris Lowney’s new book from Loyola Press. See the full list of blog hop stops here. I keep a “cheer-ups” file for paper treasures that strengthen me when I hit a snag of desolation. I realized this week that the manila folder reminds me of happy warriors, those special people Chris Lowney talks […]

Make Today Matter Blog Hop

How can small things done every day change us for the better and make the world better too? Author and leadership speaker Chris Lowney knows 10 habits that can lead to a better life and world, and we invite you to a special blog hop celebrating those habits and how each of us can Make Today Matter. Each weekday from April 30 through May 11, 2018, a different blogger will reflect on one of the […]

The Steps of the Examen

Today let’s explore the Examen through the lens of brief reflections pertaining to each step. The steps in this version of the Examen match what is presented in A Simple, Life-Changing Prayer by Jim Manney. Ask God for light. If we attune ourselves to look and listen, we may find God present within us, all around us, and speaking to us constantly. But if we don’t bother to look, it will seem that there is […]

Lowney and Leadership

Sean Salai, SJ, interviewed author Chris Lowney about Ignatian leadership. Lowney, whose books include Heroic Leadership and Pope Francis: Why He Leads the Way He Leads, addresses adapting Ignatian spirituality for secular audiences. By no means am I suggesting that one cheapen or water down the content of Ignatian spirituality. But I could envision, for example, plucking out pieces of the tradition that might appeal to businesspeople (or teachers, hospital workers or any in active […]

The I-Want-It-So-Badly Virus

Sometimes we’re driven by the I-want-it-so-badly virus: I so wanted to get to the top of the company, or to attract that attractive person, or to be rich, or to be recognized as important, or to have the best house, or to have a more exciting life. In fact, we sometimes delude ourselves into thinking that the object of our affection (the job, the car, the partner, the house) must be right for us precisely […]

The Examen: Alive in the Present Moment

Our examen teaches us, above all, to live in the present. Our days typically unfurl in frenzied preoccupation with the next meeting to attend, errands to be done, dinner to be prepared, and a hundred other tasks that crowd an efficient day. The monk Thich Nhat Hanh points out that we humans are great at planning and willing to sacrifice today to save for cars and houses tomorrow, “But we have difficulty remembering that we […]

Free to Risk Failure

We cannot choose correctly all the time. That plain fact inhibits many of us from making as many choices, and bold choices, as we ought to. Particularly prone to choice phobia are smart people who excelled in school and have ever since imagined that the real world would be similar to that setting. They shrink from making choices where an A—a good result—isn’t clearly in sight. Fear of failing or of looking foolish becomes a […]

Chris Lowney on Engaging Faith

Chris Lowney, leadership expert and author, was the guest on An Engaging Faith with Elizabeth Reardon earlier this month. Lowney is the author of Heroic Leadership and Heroic Living. He also wrote Pope Francis: Why He Leads the Way He Leads, which makes this interview particularly exciting as we experience the Pope’s visit to the United States.

Not Many Things But Much

A Latin proverb adds a spiritual dimension to the point: non multa sed multum, or “not many things but much.” Jesuits didn’t coin that phrase, though I’ve heard it attributed to them, probably because its spirit so closely aligns with other Jesuit ideals. The quality with which a work is done—the “muchness” of it—can be more important than the sheer quantity of tasks a person completes. What value, for example, that a social worker counsels […]

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