Spiritual Exercises

Do you make New Year’s resolutions? Two common ones involve getting in shape or making a commitment to deepen one’s prayer life. Former catechetical leader Paul Gallagher explains how one led to the other for him in the article “How the Spiritual Exercises Rebooted My Health.” He writes: St. Ignatius reminds us in the Spiritual […]

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The Spiritual Exercises are not just a listing of meditations separated into four “weeks.” They are much more than that. They are a work of art that has inspired thousands, if not millions, of Christians throughout the last five centuries. And while Ignatius offers them as a model of prayer and discernment, the Exercises also […]

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Most people who make the Spiritual Exercises these days do them over the course of six or seven months. This “retreat in daily life” involves daily prayer and reflection while you are doing all the the things you usually do. It’s sometimes called a “nineteenth annotation” retreat because Ignatius’s provision for this kind of retreat […]

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Pope Francis is certainly full of surprises. His words on July 31, the Feast of St. Ignatius, are a good example. Ignatius’s feast is an occasion to celebrate all things Ignatian. Jesuits recall their founder’s vision and the way the Society has sustained it for five centuries. They recommit themselves to their mission. They have […]

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This month Vinita Wright has been discussing some of the major themes of the Spiritual Exercises on her blog, Days of Deepening Friendship. I especially liked her recent post about the meditation on the Two Standards, where Ignatius challenges us to look critically at what we are attached to. Vinita brings up three disordered attachments […]

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This is a guest post by Jurell G. Sison. Yesterday was a normal day, just like any other, but for some reason I woke up and was jolted with some unexpected thoughts about life and death. I hopped in the shower and a series of unanswerable questions swept my head space. What actually happens to […]

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Ignatius thought that a particular type of ignorance was at the root of sin. The deadliest sin, he said, is ingratitude. It is “the cause, beginning, and origin of all evils and sins.” If you asked a hundred people to name the sin that’s the origin of all evils, I’ll bet none of them would […]

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Sin isn’t the human condition; it’s the explanation for the human condition. Without knowledge of sin, life makes no sense at all. I first got a glimmer of this when I was a sophomore in high school. The occasion was the first live play I had ever seen: a production of Macbeth in a high […]

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This is a guest post by Michelle Francl-Donnay for Week Seven of An Ignatian Prayer Adventure. If I had a Latin motto posted over my office door it might be Conplecte abyssum—embrace chaos, or more literally, entwine yourself into the depths. At the start of each semester my students face what I imagine seems to […]

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This is a guest post by Greg Herrle for Week Five of An Ignatian Prayer Adventure. These past two weeks have been particularly hectic for me at work, which I found to take focus away from dedicating time to this Ignatian Prayer Adventure. However, due to the hectic work schedule, I found myself trying to […]

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